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pdf The Radio Emission, X-ray Emission, and Hydrodynamics of G328.4+0.2: A Comprehensive Analysis of a Luminous Pulsar Wind Nebula, its Neutron Star, and the Progenitor Supernova Explosion

Gelfand Joseph D., Gaensler B. M., Slane Patrick O., Patnaude Daniel J., Hughes John P., Camilo Fernando
02 Apr 2007 astro-ph arxiv.org/abs/0704.0219
Abstract. We present new observational results obtained for the Galactic non-thermal radio source G328.4+0.2 to determine both if this source is a pulsar wind nebula or supernova remnant, and in either case, the physical properties of this source. Using X-ray data obtained by XMM, we confirm that the X-ray emission from this source is heavily absorbed and has a spectrum best fit by a power law model of photon index=2 with no evidence for a thermal component, the X-ray emission from G328.4+0.2 comes from a region significantly smaller than the radio emission, and that the X-ray and radio emission are significantly offset from each other. We also present the results of a new high resolution (7 arcseconds) 1.4 GHz image of G328.4+0.2 obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, and a deep search for radio pulsations using the Parkes Radio Telescope. We find that the radio emission has a flat spectrum, though some areas along the eastern edge of G328.4+0.2 have a steeper radio spectral index of ~-0.3. Additionally, we obtain a luminosity limit of the central pulsar of L_{1400} < 30 mJy kpc^2, assuming a distance of 17 kpc. In light of these observational results, we test if G328.4+0.2 is a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or a large PWN inside a supernova remnant (SNR) using a simple hydrodynamic model for the evolution of a PWN inside a SNR. As a result of this analysis, we conclude that G328.4+0.2 is a young (< 10000 years old) pulsar wind nebula formed by a low magnetic field (<10^12 G) neutron star born spinning rapidly (<10 ms) expanding into an undetected SNR formed by an energetic (>10^51 ergs), low ejecta mass (M < 5 Solar Masses) supernova explosion which occurred in a low density (n~0.03 cm^{-3}) environment.

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