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pdf On the Origin of the Dichotomy of Early-Type Galaxies: The Role of Dry Mergers and AGN Feedback

Kang Xi, Bosch Frank C. van den, Pasquali Anna
06 Apr 2007 astro-ph arxiv.org/abs/0704.0932
Abstract. Using a semi-analytical model for galaxy formation, combined with a large N-body simulation, we investigate the origin of the dichotomy among early-type galaxies. We find that boxy galaxies originate from mergers with a progenitor mass ratio $n < 2$ and with a combined cold gas mass fraction $F_{\rm cold} < 0.1$. Our model accurately reproduces the observed fraction of boxy systems as a function of luminosity and halo mass, for both central galaxies and satellites. After correcting for the stellar mass dependence, the properties of the last major merger of early-type galaxies are independent of their halo mass. This provides theoretical support for the conjecture of Pasquali et al (2007) that the stellar mass of an early-type galaxy is the main parameter that governs its isophotal shape. We argue that the observed dichotomy of early-type galaxies has a natural explanation within hierarchical structure formation, and does not require AGN feedback. Rather, we argue that it owes to the fact that more massive systems (i) have more massive progenitors, (ii) assemble later, and (iii) have a larger fraction of early-type progenitors. Each of these three trends causes the cold gas mass fraction of the progenitors of more massive early-types to be lower, so that their last major merger was dryer. Finally, our model predicts that (i) less than 10 percent of all early-type galaxies form in major mergers that involve two early-type progenitors, (ii) more than 95 percent of all boxy early-type galaxies with $M_* < 2 \times 10^{10} h^{-1} \Msun$ are satellite galaxies, and (iii) about 70 percent of all low mass early-types do not form a supermassive black hole binary at their last major merger. The latter may help to explain why low mass early-types have central cusps, while their massive counterparts have cores.

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